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Post Info TOPIC: There is a Solution


MIP Old Timer

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There is a Solution
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Big Book Study Meetings are a vital part of AA as a whole. Seriously looking into the dropout rate of AA members, its easy to see that most new AA members are either a) not getting what they need ( solution to their problem) in contemporary middle of the road AA Meetings, or b) are not Real Alcoholics and just were hard drinkers, and have the ability to stop drinking on their own

I have never met anyone "in real life" that was able to do the long term "middle of the road" path to sobriety, but it seems to be "the norm" on the internet, I have had to adjust my thinking, but at the end of the day, this is what works for me, and this is what I pass on to newcomers

There is no debate between "recovered" and "recovering" nor any debate between meetings and steps "in real life" anywhwere I have gone to meetings, which includes 3 different continents, it's all VERY simple everywhere I have ever gone

The "we" the book refers to are those of us that have "recovered" by working the steps, those that haven't worked the steps are referred to as "the still suffering alcoholic"

Rarely have we seen a person fail who has thoroughly followed our path.

Our stories disclose in a general way what we used to be like, what happened, and what we are like now. If you have decided you want what we have and are willing to go to any length to get it then you are ready to take certain steps.

At some of these we balked. We thought we could find an easier, softer way. But we could not. With all the earnestness at our command, we beg of you to be fearless and thorough from the very start. Some of us have tried to hold on to our old ideas and the result was nil until we let go absolutely.

Remember that we deal with alcohol, cunning, baffling, powerful! Without help it is too much for us. But there is One who has all power that One is God. May you find Him now!

Half measures availed us nothing. We stood at the turning point. we asked His protection and care with complete abandon.

Here are the steps we took, which are suggested as a program of recovery:



do 90 in 90
get a sponsor
work the steps
take commitments
sponsor newcomers

That formula works

I have rarely seen a person fail that thoroughly followed that path

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

We, of Alcoholics Anonymous, know thousands of men and women who were once just as hopeless as Bill. Nearly all have recovered. They have solved the drink problem.

We are average Americans. All sections of this country and many of its occupations are represented, as well as many political, economic, social, and religious backgrounds. We are people who normally would not mix. But there exists among us a fellowship, a friendliness, and an understanding which is indescribably wonderful. We are like the passengers of a great liner the moment after rescue from shipwreck when camaraderie, joyousness and democracy pervade the vessel from steerage to Captain's table. Unlike the feelings of the ship's passengers, however, our joy in escape from disaster does not subside as we go our individual ways. The feeling of having shared in a common peril is one element in the powerful cement which binds us. But that in itself would never have held us together as we are now joined.

The tremendous fact for every one of us is that we have discovered a common solution. We have a way out on which we can absolutely agree, and upon which we can join in brotherly and harmonious action. This is the great news this book carries to those who suffer from alcoholism.

Of necessity there will have to be discussion of matters medical, psychiatric, social, and religious. We are aware that these matters are from their very nature, controversial. Nothing would please us so much as to write a book which would contain no basis for contention or argument. We shall do our utmost to achieve that ideal. Most of us sense that real tolerance of other people's shortcomings and viewpoints and a respect for their opinions are attitudes which make us more useful to others. Our very lives, as ex-problem drinkers, depend upon our constant thought of others and how we may help meet their needs.

You may already have asked yourself why it is that all of us became so very ill from drinking. Doubtless you are curious to discover how and why, in the face of expert opinion to the contrary, we have recovered from a hopeless condition of mind and body. If you are an alcoholic who wants to get over it, you may already be asking What do I have to do?"

It is the purpose of this book to answer such questions specifically. We shall tell you what we have done. Before going into a detailed discussion, it may be well to summarize some points as we see them.

How many time people have said to us: "I can take it or leave it alone. Why can't he?" "Why don't you drink like a gentleman or quit?" "That fellow can't handle his liquor." "Why don't you try beer and wine?" "Lay off the hard stuff." "His will power must be weak." "He could stop if he wanted to." "She's such a sweet girl, I should think he'd stop for her sake." "The doctor told him that if he ever drank again it would kill him, but there he is all lit up again."

Now these are commonplace observations on drinkers which we hear all the time. Back of them is a world of ignorance and misunderstanding. We see that these expressions refer to people whose reactions are very different from ours.

Moderate drinkers have little trouble in giving up liquor entirely if they have good reason for it. They can take it or leave it alone.

Then we have a certain type of hard drinker. He may have the habit badly enough to gradually impair him physically and mentally. It may cause him to die a few years before his time. If a sufficiently strong reason ill health, falling in love, change of environment, or the warning of a doctor becomes operative, this man can also stop or moderate, although he may find it difficult and troublesome and may even need medical attention.

But what about the real alcoholic? He may start off as a moderate drinker; he may or may not become a continuous hard drinker; but at some stage of his drinking career he begins to lose all control of his liquor consumption, once he starts to drink.

We know that while the alcoholic keeps away from drink, as he may do for months or years, he reacts much like other men. We are equally positive that once he takes any alcohol whatever into his system, something happens, both in the bodily and mental sense, which makes it virtually impossible for him to stop. The experience of any alcoholic will abundantly confirm this.

These observations would be academic and pointless if our friend never took the first drink, thereby setting the terrible cycle in motion. Therefore, the main problem of the alcoholic centers in his mind, rather than in his body. If you ask him why he started on that last bender, the chances are he will offer you any one of a hundred alibis. Sometimes these excuses have a certain plausibility, but none of them really makes sense in the light of the havoc an alcoholic's drinking bout creates. They sound like the philosophy of the man who, having a headache, beats himself on the head with a hammer so that he can't feel the ache. If you draw this fallacious reasoning to the attention of an alcoholic, he will laugh it off, or become irritated and refuse to talk.

Once in a while he may tell the truth. And the truth, strange to say, is usually that he has no more idea why he took that first drink than you have. Some drinkers have excuses with which they are satisfied part of the time. But in their hearts they really do not know why they do it. Once this malady has a real hold, they are a baffled lot. There is the obsession that somehow, someday, they will beat the game. But they often suspect they are down for the count.

How true this is, few realize. In a vague way their families and friends sense that these drinkers are abnormal, but everybody hopefully awaits the day when the sufferer will rouse himself from his lethargy and assert his power of will.

The tragic truth is that if the man be a real alcoholic, the happy day may not arrive. He has lost control. At a certain point in the drinking of every alcoholic, he passes into a state where the most powerful desire to stop drinking is of absolutely no avail. This tragic situation has already arrived in practically every case long before it is suspected.

The fact is that most alcoholics, for reasons yet obscure, have lost the power of choice in drink. Our so called will power becomes practically nonexistent. We are unable, at certain times, to bring into our consciousness with sufficient force the memory of the suffering and humiliation of even a week or a month ago. We are without defense against the first drink.

The almost certain consequences that follow taking even a glass of beer do not crowd into the mind to deter us. If these thoughts occur, they are hazy and readily supplanted with the old threadbare idea that this time we shall handle ourselves like other people. There is a complete failure of the kind of defense that keeps one from putting his hand on a hot stove.

The alcoholic may say to himself in the most casual way, "It won't burn me this time, so here's how!" Or perhaps he doesn't think at all. How often have some of us begun to drink in this nonchalant way, and after the third or fourth, pounded on the bar and said to ourselves, "For God's sake, how did I ever get started again?" Only to have that thought supplanted by "Well, I'll stop with the sixth drink." Or "What's the use anyhow?"

When this sort of thinking is fully established in an individual with alcoholic tendencies, he has probably placed himself beyond human aid, and unless locked up, may die or to permanently insane. These stark and ugly facts have been confirmed by legions of alcohoholics throughout history. But for the grace of God, there would have been thousands more convincing demonstrations. So many want to stop but cannot.

There is a solution. Almost none of us liked the self- searching, the leveling of our pride, the confession of shortcomings which the process requires for its successful consummation. But we saw that it really worked in others, and we had come to believe in the hopelessness and futility of life as we had been living it. When, therefore, we were approached by those in whom the problem had been solved, there was nothing left for us but to pick up the simple kit of spiritual tools laid at out feet. We have found much of heaven and we have been rocketed into a fourth dimension of existence of which we had not even dreamed.

The great fact is just this, and nothing less: That we have had deep and effective spiritual experiences* which have revolutionized our whole attitude toward life

If you are as seriously alcoholic as we were, we believe there is no middle-of-the-road solution. We were in a position where life was becoming impossible, and if we had passed into the region from which there is no return through human aid, we had but two alternatives: One was to go on to the bitter end, blotting out the consciousness of our intolerable situation as best we could; and the other, to accept spiritual help. This we did because we honestly wanted to, and were willing to make the effort.

Those having religious affiliations will find here nothing disturbing to their beliefs or ceremonies. There is no friction among us over such matters.

We think it no concern of ours what religious bodies our members identify themselves with as individuals. this should be an entirely personal affair which each one decides for himself in the light of past associations, or his present choice. Not all of join religious bodies, but most of us favor such memberships.

In the following chapter, there appears an explanation of alcoholism, as we understand it, then a chapter addressed to the agnostic. Many who once were in this class are now among our members. Surprisingly enough, we find such convictions no great obstacle to a spiritual experience.

Further on, clear-cut directions are given showing how we recovered.



-- Edited by LinBaba on Friday 26th of November 2010 08:53:34 PM

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it's not the change that's painful, it's the resistance to change that is painful



MIP Old Timer

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Great stuff LB. In other words:

*We* are a bunch of drunks that everyone else had written off...*we* have recovered...*We* so believe in what *we* did that we're telling you how *we* did it. *We* know it will work for you if you pretty much do exactly as *we* did -- *we'd* love to say that there was some other way, but*we* saw among the initial crowd some other people not do what *we* did exactly, and they drank again. *We* don't want that to happen to you.

Fin.

Steve

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MIP Old Timer

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SteveP wrote:

Great stuff LB. In other words:

*We* are a bunch of drunks that everyone else had written off...*we* have recovered...*We* so believe in what *we* did that we're telling you how *we* did it. *We* know it will work for you if you pretty much do exactly as *we* did -- *we'd* love to say that there was some other way, but*we* saw among the initial crowd some other people not do what *we* did exactly, and they drank again. *We* don't want that to happen to you.

Fin.

Steve




I don't think it's the -only- way, but it's a recipe that worked for us, I'm just saying this is what that recipe is, -this- is what AA is

If someone can find another way, I support that wholly, we need to follow our heart, some don't need AA at all, some are able to do a -cafeteria- approach, a little of this, a little of that, some are able to do a -middle of the road- "Program", This is just something to try when all else fails, because it works, and truthfully, I think that is the only time anyone would ever try it, I think to get the necessary willingness everything else has got to have failed, we have to have run out of options to get the gift of desperation this process required

There is a solution. Almost none of us liked the self- searching, the leveling of our pride, the confession of shortcomings which the process requires for its successful consummation. But we saw that it really worked in others, and we had come to believe in the hopelessness and futility of life as we had been living it. When, therefore, we were approached by those in whom the problem had been solved, there was nothing left for us but to pick up the simple kit of spiritual tools laid at out feet.

The only reason I worked the program is I had run out of options, I had no other choice, it was work the steps or die, that doesn't make me better or worse or special, it makes me someone who ran out of options


That doesn't make "better then" or worse then" it makes me someone who was whipped, and finally had to surrender

AA and the steps are for people that everything else failed, if someone can get sober some other way, that's a good thing


 



-- Edited by LinBaba on Saturday 27th of November 2010 09:39:52 AM

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it's not the change that's painful, it's the resistance to change that is painful

jj


MIP Old Timer

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i had to surrender.......... this program (what LB just wrote,) works for me.  i cannot ¨not¨ work this program.  i am too sick to make it on my own.  doing ´whatever it takes´ is what works for me and AA showed me how, through the AAs that came before me. 
thanks LB
jj

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Member

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LB shared

The only reason I worked the program is I had run out of options

Me too. I didn't know where else to turn. Nothing else I had tried worked. I was desperate. Totally desperate.

Thank God for AA for this alcoholic!aww

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Sober today thanks to the Miracle of AA


MIP Old Timer

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Thanks LB -- I agree with what you're saying and sorry if it looked like I was saying that AA is the only way (though to date, for me, it has proven to be the only way).

I guess that what I'm trying to say is that you've given me new insight into the passage, one that I must read a zillion times without quite having seen it that way before.

They were saying that half measures availed *them* nothing and that *they* had rarely (and yep, as they say, Bill wished that he had said it as "never") seen anyone fail who thoroughly followed *their* path.

Steve


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MIP Old Timer

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I agree 100% LB.  I often tell people that while AA is not the only way, my experience is that it works best for most.

Larry,
------------------------
"I was simply existing to drink and drinking for oblivion; caught up in a vicious cycle, catchin' hell and calling it fun."

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